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Music

ONE TO WATCH // SamueL

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When I think of West London, Notting Hill, The Westway and the iconic Hammersmith Apollo encapsulate my headspace quicker than a posse of boozed up footballers spotting a kebab shop post-Mayfair nightclub. All three landmarks are synonymous with the rich musical history of Blighty. From reggae and dub soundsystem culture at the forthcoming carnival; punk rock legends The Clash name-dropping the “new-age” yellow brick road in their song “London’s Burning” and hosting sell-out tour dates to some of the world’s biggest names. For SamueL, the journey to reach such an audio ascendency is still in it’s infancy but the homegrown hip-hop infused MC remains resolute and ready to step up to the M.I.C.

Wat U Sayin recently spoke to the young blood on the battle of being a white rapper,his debut mixtape Pleasant Surprise and resisting the temptation of rhyming with an American twang.

Introduce yourself to the people and feed them with a starter on how you started out.

Sup, my artist and birth name is SamueL and I’m a spitter from West London just trying to put my heart into my art. I started as just being a fan of Hip-Hop, and not just one style, like conscious  backpacker stuff or ignant thugged outish, I like a dose of pretty much any sub-genre of Hip-Hop that you can think of, as long as the music is authentic and done well I’m good with it. I still feel like a fan just trying to make the music I love. I’m very fond of a good conceptual solid album and that’s what I set out to do with my first project ‘Pleasant Surprise’, I just wanted to get my debut ‘baby’ out the way and take it from there. Unfortunately there’s no sexy story why I started out, just the pure love I have for the expression.

Which record or musical moment inspired you to take your craft more seriously?

Hmmmmm, I’ve always had a passion for lyrics and words and had the dream of becoming an artist like the ones I admire, but I didn’t have a whole lot of self-belief. I don’t really like to admit and bring race into it but being a British white boy whose favourite rappers, bar the man Marshall Mathers, were predominantly black Americans, I didn’t initially feel like I had it in me to make music with such soul and style as they did. It really took a certain person to come into my life and change my way of thinking for me to get my art off it’s arse and believe in myself, and I will always appreciate them for that.

I’ve been listening to your first mixtape, Pleasant Surprise for the last few weeks now and it’s promising to have another homegrown artist making his way. The title striked me from the off mind. Is it linked to the old saying ‘Never judge a book by its cover’, as some wouldn’t see you as a rapper in the ‘Conventional’ sense?

First off, thanks for giving the project a proper thorough listen, it’s tough to get people to give your album a chance when most folk these days are just looking for a single they can bump for a week until the next hot track drops. I guess the title does refer to that saying, and that probably relates to my last answer, but mainly, by the point I renamed the project to that title, I had gotten over the fact that I’m not the traditional ‘rapper’ looks-wise and had become quietly confident that what we were working on was going to be of a certain level. A level that I don’t think even my friends and family thought I was capable of, which is why I felt ‘Pleasant Surprise’ was such a suitable title. The project wasn’t meant to be mind-blowing, overly innovative stuff, but just good music that would be an enjoyable pleasant listen. Not many people around me even knew that I rapped so that was where the ‘surprise’ came in, I’m just glad that I made damn sure it was a ‘pleasant’ one!

SamueL – BANGER! (Prod. by JZA)

There seems to be a heavy Boom-Bap, 90’s Rap element on the mixtape with the samples and your laidback but potent punchline flow. Was there a conscious element to retain a British feel with the lyrical content or did you want the tape to be accessible as possible?

All I did was try to make music that was to my personal taste, and I’d safely assume the fact that I’m really into so-called ‘old school’ Hip-Hop is why the project has that feel to it, but I wanted to keep it real and that meant repping my home when it came to the substance of the spitting, which is why I don’t shy away from using our slang and sayings, or allow my accent to stray and sound like I’m from the States. There was no conscious effort to be accessible to anyone in particular, more like be accessible to everyone by just trying to produce ‘good’ timeless music that really shows mine and the producers’ love for it. It’s a shame that there haven’t been more Hip-Hop artists from the UK that I could say have influenced me so far because I am actually very proud of where I’m from and I do want that to shine through.

SamueL – Sweet Rapport (Prod. by JZA)

Support the rising MC via the links below and till later…stay F.L.Y

TWITTER – @theonesamuelsun
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Fresh Produce // HIGH KLASSIFIED (Part 2)

HighKlassified

In the second and final part of Wat You Sayin’s interview with rising Canadian Producer High Klassified, he talks about his rapper brothers, his love of The Neptunes and why upping your swag is important in this age.

In the last two years, there seems to be a very strong Southern hip-hop element across electronica and hip-hop itself. What’s your take on it and has it subconsciously influenced your music?

I used to listen to a lot of A$AP Rocky and I had a laidback beat flavour a couple of months ago but now I just go with the flow. I don’t know if I had a lot of inspirations but I used to listen to a lot of Neptunes and use their chords. I don’t really like listening to EDM Trap which sounds like Hardcore.  I’m more into keeping that real Trap flavour from the US, as there’s a hip-hop trap and there’s a dubstep trap but I listen to a lot trap artists like Waka Flocka and Gucci Mane.

It’s funny you mention the Neptunes as they’re my favourite producers too. What are your favourite tracks from them?

Yeah it’s kinda recent and it’s called Gone Away by Joe with Pharrell on the hook and it’s a pretty great track. I really love Cot Damn and everything they did with Jay-Z and for Toni Braxton.

Toni Braxton and Loon – On The Freeway?

[laughs] Yeah Yeah!

Toni Braxton & Loon – On The Freeway

That’s a sick track. You know The Neptunes Presents Clones is almost ten years old?

What?!… Wow.

It’s making me feel old man!

[laughs] Word

You’ve worked with rappers BB-Boy  and Green Hypnotic and I’ve listened to k-os, K’naan and the more obvious example in Drake. What’s the rap scene like in Canada and is there anyone I should be looking out for? 

BB-Boy and Green are my brothers.

Oh really?

Yeah. Actually Green is pretty much doing his thing now. I don’t really follow the hip-hop scene, there are a couple of local artists and don’t know about anyone whose about to blow but there is a pretty good artist in Montreal called I.Blast and he’s doing his thing.

I.Blast – Money Is A Drug

Your recent beattape artwork evokes an ethereal feel almost like you’re a glutton for the galaxy.

I’m more into world stuff that looks like the galaxy and a greater space image.

That personifies itself on the following tape ‘Neo ReFlexion’, which was shorter than Flexury as well. Was that more a case of you wanting to release music or just to keep eardrums fresh about your output?

I had some mixing problems with Flexury, as I had just started using Ableton and there were a couple of problems with the software. There’s a normalizer when I render my beats and shit, so Flexury had some mixing problems concerning the mastering. I just dropped Neo Reflexion to show that there was an improvement in the mixing and to have a tape which was a laidback flavour. As Flexury was a taste of both, there are quick beats, slow beats, hard beats, soft beats and my next one is going to be more aggressive.

High-Klassified – Neo ReFlexion

When you say aggressive, does that entail more rappers being involved or improving the vocal sampling?

I’m gonna do both. I’ve got this track called Scopola which is a really hard upper Calyptic track and I’m gonna do a visual for it and drop it. I’ve got some beats with voice samples too but right now I’m really into faster trap beats.

When will you release something new?

Actually in two weeks, a beat called the BabyFace. It’s a kinda soulful trap and I might drop it, as it’s getting a bit warmer. It’s Summer Trap and hopefully next month drop the visual for my next beat Scopola.

Have you already filmed it?

We just had a meeting last week to film it, so we’re gonna start this weekend and I’ll shortly be doing a 20 min mix for Music Is My Sanctuary.

When are you crossing the pond i.e Flexin’ in London ?

I’m playing in LA at Low End Theory next month with Beat Cinema but it’s not confirmed yet. So from there, I’m gonna peep for bookings in London after that!

Are you doing any festivals in the summer?

I’m doing all the festivals in Montreal and Quebec and that’s about it.

No doubt someone will pick you up.

Word. No Doubt.

The producer is gaining more prominence than a vocalist in recent times and people have a genuine interest in finding out a great deluge more information on those behind the scenes. How do you feel about that?

With the internet now, it’s harder to be an artist as you gotta be a good artist and a good-looking artist [laughs]

[laughs] Is that why you got the swag going on?

Yeah my agent is really making me understand how important it is for an artist to have a good image and to be musically good too, as this is what will make me look different from the others. There are a lot of good artists but there are also a lot of SoundCloud stars too. So you have to show yourself, make visuals for beats and take good pictures for people to relate to me.

Are you still in college?

Yeah

How do you balance the books and the beats?

It’s pretty hard…I don’t sleep a lot. Music is my job too, so I have to finish beats for clients and then wake up and go to school at like 6 in the morning and I come home at 6 at night to work. It’s kinda hard but I’m almost done with college, so I just can’t wait to get done with that.

Are you at all surprised by the reception Kaytranada has received?

He has worked for it and really deserves it for real. He’s a really good DJ and a good producer.

Are you guys going to collaborate again soon?

We collab a lot and we’re playing a night together soon. We’re really good friends and I think he’s doing a Euro tour next month too.

I’ll have to get down to that. Are there any new tunes I should be on the lookout for?

Dilemma by Mr Carmack and LongliveASAP (Lakim Trap Refix)

Dilemma – Mr Carmack

A$AP Rocky – Long Live A$AP (Lakim Trap Refix)

Hopscotch by him is a banger as well.

Yeah he’s good.

Is he from America?

I think so but his Twitter is not so clear.

You’ve got an agent and dress fly too but some producers prefer to be anonymous and let the music do the talking. Do you reckon you’ll ever do that?

I’m really like into having attention and fashion, so I like playing with my image differently from other producers. Some like to be low-key, others like to have good swag but not a super fashion swag like me. I just like to go out and when I play I just like to go nuts and vibe out which is cool.

Thanks for giving me your time after this long Tom & Jerry chase.

Word Man. Take it easy.

BONUS READING: http://www.redbullmusicacademy.com/magazine/booty-bakery-feature

For more info on High-Klass, follow him on Twitter @HighKlassified  and check out his SoundCloud


FRESH TING FRIDAY

mr_fresh

Mr. Carmack – Hopscotch

J Dilla – Trucks (Gary Numan has never sounded this gooooood)

James Blake – Life Round Here DA FRESH TING

k-os – Mojo On

Daft Punk – Get Lucky (ft. Pharrell)

John Legend – Green Light (ft.Andre 3000) (Annie Starlight Remix)

 

ItsNate ft. GFrSH,Catch’Em x Phaze One – WSLTA (Remix) Directed by the man like H.Houdini


Fresh Produce // HIGH KLASSIFIED (Part 1)

HighKlassified

Montréal. The City of Saints is a musical menagerie built on a healthy harmonic hotbed with the likes of Leonard Cohen, Arcade Fire, A-Trak and more recently, Lunice, showcasing the firm base and burgeoning breadth of musicality. Yet, the city has been at the forefront of the new age hybrid of experimentalism fused with hip-hop and soul via the rising Piu-Piu beat scene in tandem with the Alaiz crew over the last two years. A marauding myriad of beatsmiths have originated from or assimilated to the francophone fabric such as Musoni, Kaytranada, Bueller, Kenlo Craqnuques and Da-P to name a few.  One such native Kevin Vincent aka High-Klassified makes riddims which induce you into intergalactic reverie and ring your sweat-laden t-shirt out (post-skank) in equal measure. In the first instalment of this Fresh Produce edition, Wat You Sayin caught up with the young producer to talk about his breakthrough beat, the Piu-Piu movement and his home city.

Introduce yourself to the novices and knowledgeable folk.

I’m High-Klassified, real name Kevin and I actually started making beats about three to four years ago making beats as my brothers are rappers, so I was kind of into music at that moment of time. I actually started how to learn on FL Studio then started to learn my keys via YouTube Videos and by ear. So now I’m here in 2k13 working on beats again I guess!

What record did you first hear which made you want give producing a go?

I’ve been doing beats for a moment and never took it seriously. My state of mind was like the minute I start college, I’m just going to drop everything and just do my shit at school but since I started being a part of the Piu-Piu Movement, people have been fucking with my music a lot. So around 2k11, I was really into this and thought I should do it as a living.

I’ve been listening to mixtapes by yourself, Kaytranada and Da-P for a while now. What’s the whole back story about the Alaiz collective and the Piu-Piu movement that have helped the experimental hip-hop scene in Montreal grow?

In 2k11, I started to chill with Da-P, so he was like my partner in crime and we used to make a lot of beats together and then I met Colin Musoni. He’s a member of the Piu-Piu movement and made a beattape with him called 90’s Babies. After that, we just chilled together and went downtown to music festivals then we met Kaytradamus [which is Kaytranada now] and we started making beats together. It was more about meetings in music festivals and hip-hop karaoke’s.

90’s Babies Vol.1 – High-Klassified x MusoNi

It sounds like it grew organically from friends making music for fun to the present. Did you ever think at any point that it would go global?

Actually, I had no idea. When I dropped 90’s Babies, it was nice as some people from the US added me and others from the UK. Then Lunice dropped this beat I made called Drama Trap in a couple of his sets and that was kind of a huge start for me, as more people started to get in contact and asked for some beats.

That’s the first time I heard your music in one of his sets at Notting Hill Carnival.

Yeah then Baauer played it in his Rinse FM mix.

High-Klassified – Drama Trap via BBM Vol.1

Previously your city had artists such as Leonard Cohen and Arcade Fire emanating or coming to the city to showcase their talents originally and now there is a burgeoning wave of hip-hop related folk. We’ve talked a little bit about you guys coming together as part of Piu-Piu but how would you describe Montreal as a rich musical setting? 

Actually it’s kinda recent that Montreal has been into that beat scene because people used to be scared about producing beats and being different. So since the Piu-Piu movement started around 2k11 and 2k12, people have started to come out of the basements and be more creative musically.

Is the Booty Bakery one of the main parties people from the scene play at?

Well I played a lot at the Booty Bakery as the founder of the movement is a friend of mine.

Would you say those nights have a similar vibe to a Low End Theory night in Los Angeles?

I’d say it’s not that huge but it’s a nice place for us and our community to showcase our new sound. In Montreal, there are a lot of clubs but they are playing a lot of Dancehall, Hip-Hop and Reggae but the Booty Bakery really gave us the chance to go out there and do what we really do. So this is what makes it different from all of the other nights in Montreal.

Cool. Flexury was your first solo beatape, what was the inspiration behind the title and how you compiled those tracks together?

I usually describe my music as music to flex to and it’s about going nuts on it.

Spazzing out and shit?

Yeah and my character has a luxury image to it, as a lot of beatmakers here are really grimy and I’m actually one of the most physically cleanest producers [laughs]

Are we talking in terms of swag, beats or just the whole shebang?

My swag, like the way I dress is just seen as luxury. I wear designer clothes and people..

I think I clocked you wearing some Jeremy Scott’s and thought there must be some fly shit going on!

[Laughs] Word. I wear a lot of Jeremy Scott and Givenchy, that’s why I have that kind of luxury image and mentality, so I just mix the luxury and flex.

What made you name your track “London Flexin” on the tape?

Actually a guy from Mad Tech Records (Owned by deep house honcho Kerri Chandler) came to me and asked if I was down to remix a song of one of his artists and I said yeah for sure. MadTech Records is a label from London and they suggested let’s call it Europe Flexin and I was like “No, No, let’s call it London Flexin, since it’s flexin’ music and it’s a London voice sample from Kashii’s Make This”.

I’ve heard your recent smooth Rihanna Stay remix. Do you have plans to do any more soon?

Yeah sure. I’m just searching for acapellas at the minute. Since Flexury, I’m more into using vocal samples for refixes and remixes.

Rihanna – Stay (High Klassified Trap Remix)

Stay primed for part two of the High Klassified interview next week.


FRESH TING FRIDAY

mr_fresh

The thirteenth edition of Fresh Frost Ting Friday is by no means an unlucky affair, so buss up the speaker and let it roll (a la Crazy D)  with the selection below.

Da-P– Pandora

Kendrick Lamar x Drake x Djemba Djemba – Poetic Justice (Duncan Gerow Refix)

Kidkanevil x Tehbis – Saturday Cartoons

Mono/Poly – Voyage On

Jessie Ware – If You’re Never Gonna Move (T.I.P Remix Cascading Aquadrops…Woooooi!

Mary J Blige – Real Love (Shash’u Remix)

Yoin – Digits

TLC – Creep (Kaytranada‘s Creepier Edition)

TOKiMONSTA feat. Kool Keith – The Force

Q-Tip – Go Hard

Mr.Carmack x Arnold – Muney  (Gimme Dat) DEFROSTING

Nokia – Kick


Fresh Produce // TRC Interview (Part 3)

trc_640x400In the third and final part of the chat with homegrown producer don TRC, he talks about calamitous DJ sets, the recent Trap music obsession and wishing he produced a seminal Joker riddim.

What’s the funniest thing that’s happened to you so far?

One time I was playing back to back with Apostle but we had two separate bookings. I was about 100 miles out and he was the same too. We were going to the same place after our individual sets and he phoned me saying that he’s left his CD’s. By this point, I’ve finished my other booking and driven home to my house. I then jump back in my car and drive all the way back up the M1 to Barnsley. I then open my boot and I’ve left my CD’s at home!

What happened in the end?

He didn’t get paid and I put fifty pound petrol in my car for no reason. It was just a joke! [laughs]

Are there any homegrown or US producers you’d still like to collaborate with?

In Grime, all the people I speak to now are the ones I’ve always looked up to and they’ve had a big influence on my music. People like Dexplicit, J-Sweet, P-Jam and Terror Danjah. Now I’ve had my little releases in the scene, they’ve started speaking to me and I’m cool with them.  In America, I’d love to work with T-Minus and ‘40’, even Just Blaze too but out of all of them, it would probably be J.U.S.T.I.C.E League and T-Minus.

K-Os – Faith ft. Drake (prod. by J.U.S.T.I.C.E League)

Are there any particular tunes you wished you produced?

Pffft. There are a lot of T2 Bassline tunes as he was just an absolute monster and was too sick. I think Joker as well. I used to listen to Joker a lot and when I started speaking to him, I couldn’t believe he was younger than me (only by a week) but I told him “You were making those tunes, when I was in school?!” I wish I made Gullybrook Lane.

 

Joker – Gullybrook Lane

At the moment, there’s this obsession with trap. What’s your take on it?

I think Redlight tweeted the other day that Trap is turning into put a donk on it and I thought that was very true, as since Lex Luger has leaked his sounds everybody is using the same snare, the same bass and it’s becoming really rinsed. I loved it at first but now everyone is using the same sounds and chords, it’s become really predictable and bland.

I recently spoke to some producers from the US and Canada and I was really conscious of using that label to describe the music but then you go onto Soundcloud and there are a million and one people trying to replicate that sound.

Loads of people just wanna sound like Lex Luger. When he first did it, he was so sick as nobody sounded like him but now it’s just the end. Even well-known massive producers in America were copying his sound and I’m like what’s going on? It was almost like cheating and I couldn’t rate it, even though I got deep into 808 hip-hop, I could never get deep into trap as it’s too like cliché. Hudson Mohawke and them man are sick, they are completely different from Lex Luger.

 

TNGHT – Obsession

What do you have coming up in the pipeline?

I don’t really like talking about it but I’m in the process of sorting out management at the moment but I’m keeping things wrapped up ready for the new year. I never really like gassing like others and then nothing comes out. You have to be humble until everything comes out.

It reminds me of the classic lines you get from people on social networks in the run up to the new year, “ 2013’s gonna be my year bruv. Me and ma dags are gonna go HARD”

[laughs] I was having the exact same conversation the other day about all this bullshit. I was thinking “This year’s gonna be my year” and all this bollocks. “I was shit this year but this year’s gonna be mine ya get me” Come on man, you’re supposed to go in regardless what time of the year it is. That’s all gas man and I’ve even seen a few people tweeting already… f**k all of that!

Follow TRC on Twitter @TRCproducer for information on releases and DJ sets and check out his Soundcloud 

STOP PRESS:  A snippet from his forthcoming mix CD Legs 11

Rihanna – Diamonds (TRC 4×4 Remix)


Fresh Produce // TRC Interview (Part 2)

trc_640x400

As part of the new Fresh Produce series, the second instalment of the TRC interview sees the West Midlands beat-smith talk about MC’s using his Grime instrumentals, the Leak EP series and his connection to the Stay Fresh collective.

So what made you switch back to making Grime? Did you feel more confident after your Bassline exploits?

To be honest, I never stopped making Grime but at the time I was doing it, there were no open doors to get involved and nobody would support my songs as I was unknown. At that point, Bassline was buzzing and I had a lot of attention from DJ’s on BBC 1Xtra and a lot of airplay, so I thought maybe my Grime might take off a bit. So I started to push out some of my Grime tunes and even though the Oo Aa Ee tune only came out in 2010, I made that in 2007. So that tune was four years old before it started blowing up and everyone was like “Where’s this tune come from?!” and I made it just as I started doing Bassline. A lot of people don’t realise most of my grime tunes are three or four years old.

What was different at the time which made you more comfortable to release those riddims?

I think it was my position which was different. I knew that if people liked it they would support it, so it was another doorway to do something I always wanted.

The same instrumental was used for Boo You too. What was it like having different MC’s from across the country jumping on that and also the Butterz crew helping out?

It’s good to see that artists value your music and they rate it. It’s nice to know that and inspires you to keep you going as well. It reaches out to more people and when they hear a big artist has used your instrumental, they wanna know who made it and then next thing you know someone else is knocking at your door and the work just keeps expanding. Having the releases on Butterz as well has helped raise my profile in Grime.

After that you had Trim jump on ‘Skipping Rope’, what was it like to work with such a revered figure from the early epochs of Grime?

It was massive as these are people I’ve listened to since I was like 13. It was a big thing for me and an honour to work with these kind of people. I’d never dreamed of working with him…I’d love to work with Trim again.

You’ve been releasing your Leak E.P series of late. How long have you been working on all those tunes for?

Some of them for a long time and others a couple of days. Most of the tunes I pitched out and they weren’t getting anywhere to be honest.  I think the first Leak EP was a bit of a dark period in my career, as I was getting frustrated that things weren’t getting out there quite as much as I wanted to and I didn’t even promote it. I just pasted a Sendspace link on my Twitter and it happened to do really well. It got about 2,000 downloads in a couple of days and it was a shock.

Do you think it’s better for the listener to make a natural choice rather than force feed it?

Definitely. If there’s a demand for it then that’s good but some people go over the top with spamming. If you’ve got a little fan base where people are interested in your music and they are not aware that things are coming out. Sometimes I’ve had people pop up and say “Have you not had any new releases?” and I’ve just put some out!

This year you’ve had the two sequels to the first Leak E.P released. On the 2nd one, there seems to be a bigger Southern Hip-Hop influence. Where did that come from?

With the second EP, I was trying to show people that I was versatile and can do almost any genre. At the time Leak E.P 2 came out, I got a lot of interest from A&R’s at the major labels and I thought it was a good time to show them I could do anything. I think that’s where the influence came from and a lot of people did contact me about beats and I got a lot of remix work off the back of it. So it did help a lot.

You recently released the third E.P. What does that release signify now in terms of your position as a producer?

That’s a hard one to answer as I’m in a bit of a funny position at the moment [laughs] I think it’s more of what I’m trying to aim it towards and it was quite hip-hop prominent [Leak EP 2]. So I’m trying to aim for that direction but at the same time a lot of the feedback I was getting said that the beats were good but we didn’t expect you to move away from your old style so much. It was a bit too much for people to take in the last Leak and I almost forgot what people kind of know me for. A lot of the beats did get used like P Money for his freestyle and that got 50,000 hits in a few days. A couple of other people have put vocals on the beats for their EP’s and it has opened a lot of doors in unusual departments.

I scrolled through your Soundcloud page and saw that a few remix clips for Aiden Grimshaw and Josh Osho. Are those out now or have they been put on the backburner by the major labels?

Well when the Aiden Grimshaw one first got played, I got loads of requests asking when that’s coming out and they accepted it which got released eventually. I know the Josh Osho one came out as well. I think the Aiden Grimshaw one was initially intended just for promo use but it got battered on radio!

Aiden Grimshaw – Is This Love (TRC Mix)

You’re from Wolverhampton?

Yeah.

Bar the football team, what’s poppin’ off in your hometown that people might not know about?

Urm…well [tumbleweed] If i’m being totally honest, nothing is popping off round here! There’s a lot of talent round ere not just in music but obviously you’ve got S-X as well who has just soared in the space of a couple of years. Wolves gets puts in a box with Birmingham and people don’t realise that Wolves and Birmingham are both totally different places. I wouldn’t say it’s popping off as it’s a quiet city.

Does it help you get inspiration if there’s any distractions whilst making tunes?

I suppose so but I’m more inspired when I go out of town. I’m more inspired by things that are happening, some action and the only thing which happens here is the odd big rave once in a while.

Do you have a connection to any of the Stay Fresh guys?

I’ve grown up with a lot of them and we use to be in a group called TYG when we were like fifteen. It was a little Grime group and I’m quite close with most of them. I used to be best friends with Menace aka Stay Fresh Don Menna Do you know who that is?

No, I don’t but they may have been around when I went to a Woo Riddim launch about three years ago.

They are all branching out into their own little thing now and they are all getting credit for it which is great to see people from the ends blowing up as well. I’ve been friends with them before Stay Fresh up until the point where some of us used to be in the same group and we used to play grime sets. We’d be upstairs and my mum was shouting off downstairs!

Check back to the site for the third and final part of the TRC interview next week.