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Posts tagged “Grime

Fresh Produce // TRC Interview (Part 3)

trc_640x400In the third and final part of the chat with homegrown producer don TRC, he talks about calamitous DJ sets, the recent Trap music obsession and wishing he produced a seminal Joker riddim.

What’s the funniest thing that’s happened to you so far?

One time I was playing back to back with Apostle but we had two separate bookings. I was about 100 miles out and he was the same too. We were going to the same place after our individual sets and he phoned me saying that he’s left his CD’s. By this point, I’ve finished my other booking and driven home to my house. I then jump back in my car and drive all the way back up the M1 to Barnsley. I then open my boot and I’ve left my CD’s at home!

What happened in the end?

He didn’t get paid and I put fifty pound petrol in my car for no reason. It was just a joke! [laughs]

Are there any homegrown or US producers you’d still like to collaborate with?

In Grime, all the people I speak to now are the ones I’ve always looked up to and they’ve had a big influence on my music. People like Dexplicit, J-Sweet, P-Jam and Terror Danjah. Now I’ve had my little releases in the scene, they’ve started speaking to me and I’m cool with them.  In America, I’d love to work with T-Minus and ‘40’, even Just Blaze too but out of all of them, it would probably be J.U.S.T.I.C.E League and T-Minus.

K-Os – Faith ft. Drake (prod. by J.U.S.T.I.C.E League)

Are there any particular tunes you wished you produced?

Pffft. There are a lot of T2 Bassline tunes as he was just an absolute monster and was too sick. I think Joker as well. I used to listen to Joker a lot and when I started speaking to him, I couldn’t believe he was younger than me (only by a week) but I told him “You were making those tunes, when I was in school?!” I wish I made Gullybrook Lane.

 

Joker – Gullybrook Lane

At the moment, there’s this obsession with trap. What’s your take on it?

I think Redlight tweeted the other day that Trap is turning into put a donk on it and I thought that was very true, as since Lex Luger has leaked his sounds everybody is using the same snare, the same bass and it’s becoming really rinsed. I loved it at first but now everyone is using the same sounds and chords, it’s become really predictable and bland.

I recently spoke to some producers from the US and Canada and I was really conscious of using that label to describe the music but then you go onto Soundcloud and there are a million and one people trying to replicate that sound.

Loads of people just wanna sound like Lex Luger. When he first did it, he was so sick as nobody sounded like him but now it’s just the end. Even well-known massive producers in America were copying his sound and I’m like what’s going on? It was almost like cheating and I couldn’t rate it, even though I got deep into 808 hip-hop, I could never get deep into trap as it’s too like cliché. Hudson Mohawke and them man are sick, they are completely different from Lex Luger.

 

TNGHT – Obsession

What do you have coming up in the pipeline?

I don’t really like talking about it but I’m in the process of sorting out management at the moment but I’m keeping things wrapped up ready for the new year. I never really like gassing like others and then nothing comes out. You have to be humble until everything comes out.

It reminds me of the classic lines you get from people on social networks in the run up to the new year, “ 2013’s gonna be my year bruv. Me and ma dags are gonna go HARD”

[laughs] I was having the exact same conversation the other day about all this bullshit. I was thinking “This year’s gonna be my year” and all this bollocks. “I was shit this year but this year’s gonna be mine ya get me” Come on man, you’re supposed to go in regardless what time of the year it is. That’s all gas man and I’ve even seen a few people tweeting already… f**k all of that!

Follow TRC on Twitter @TRCproducer for information on releases and DJ sets and check out his Soundcloud 

STOP PRESS:  A snippet from his forthcoming mix CD Legs 11

Rihanna – Diamonds (TRC 4×4 Remix)

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Fresh Produce // TRC Interview (Part 2)

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As part of the new Fresh Produce series, the second instalment of the TRC interview sees the West Midlands beat-smith talk about MC’s using his Grime instrumentals, the Leak EP series and his connection to the Stay Fresh collective.

So what made you switch back to making Grime? Did you feel more confident after your Bassline exploits?

To be honest, I never stopped making Grime but at the time I was doing it, there were no open doors to get involved and nobody would support my songs as I was unknown. At that point, Bassline was buzzing and I had a lot of attention from DJ’s on BBC 1Xtra and a lot of airplay, so I thought maybe my Grime might take off a bit. So I started to push out some of my Grime tunes and even though the Oo Aa Ee tune only came out in 2010, I made that in 2007. So that tune was four years old before it started blowing up and everyone was like “Where’s this tune come from?!” and I made it just as I started doing Bassline. A lot of people don’t realise most of my grime tunes are three or four years old.

What was different at the time which made you more comfortable to release those riddims?

I think it was my position which was different. I knew that if people liked it they would support it, so it was another doorway to do something I always wanted.

The same instrumental was used for Boo You too. What was it like having different MC’s from across the country jumping on that and also the Butterz crew helping out?

It’s good to see that artists value your music and they rate it. It’s nice to know that and inspires you to keep you going as well. It reaches out to more people and when they hear a big artist has used your instrumental, they wanna know who made it and then next thing you know someone else is knocking at your door and the work just keeps expanding. Having the releases on Butterz as well has helped raise my profile in Grime.

After that you had Trim jump on ‘Skipping Rope’, what was it like to work with such a revered figure from the early epochs of Grime?

It was massive as these are people I’ve listened to since I was like 13. It was a big thing for me and an honour to work with these kind of people. I’d never dreamed of working with him…I’d love to work with Trim again.

You’ve been releasing your Leak E.P series of late. How long have you been working on all those tunes for?

Some of them for a long time and others a couple of days. Most of the tunes I pitched out and they weren’t getting anywhere to be honest.  I think the first Leak EP was a bit of a dark period in my career, as I was getting frustrated that things weren’t getting out there quite as much as I wanted to and I didn’t even promote it. I just pasted a Sendspace link on my Twitter and it happened to do really well. It got about 2,000 downloads in a couple of days and it was a shock.

Do you think it’s better for the listener to make a natural choice rather than force feed it?

Definitely. If there’s a demand for it then that’s good but some people go over the top with spamming. If you’ve got a little fan base where people are interested in your music and they are not aware that things are coming out. Sometimes I’ve had people pop up and say “Have you not had any new releases?” and I’ve just put some out!

This year you’ve had the two sequels to the first Leak E.P released. On the 2nd one, there seems to be a bigger Southern Hip-Hop influence. Where did that come from?

With the second EP, I was trying to show people that I was versatile and can do almost any genre. At the time Leak E.P 2 came out, I got a lot of interest from A&R’s at the major labels and I thought it was a good time to show them I could do anything. I think that’s where the influence came from and a lot of people did contact me about beats and I got a lot of remix work off the back of it. So it did help a lot.

You recently released the third E.P. What does that release signify now in terms of your position as a producer?

That’s a hard one to answer as I’m in a bit of a funny position at the moment [laughs] I think it’s more of what I’m trying to aim it towards and it was quite hip-hop prominent [Leak EP 2]. So I’m trying to aim for that direction but at the same time a lot of the feedback I was getting said that the beats were good but we didn’t expect you to move away from your old style so much. It was a bit too much for people to take in the last Leak and I almost forgot what people kind of know me for. A lot of the beats did get used like P Money for his freestyle and that got 50,000 hits in a few days. A couple of other people have put vocals on the beats for their EP’s and it has opened a lot of doors in unusual departments.

I scrolled through your Soundcloud page and saw that a few remix clips for Aiden Grimshaw and Josh Osho. Are those out now or have they been put on the backburner by the major labels?

Well when the Aiden Grimshaw one first got played, I got loads of requests asking when that’s coming out and they accepted it which got released eventually. I know the Josh Osho one came out as well. I think the Aiden Grimshaw one was initially intended just for promo use but it got battered on radio!

Aiden Grimshaw – Is This Love (TRC Mix)

You’re from Wolverhampton?

Yeah.

Bar the football team, what’s poppin’ off in your hometown that people might not know about?

Urm…well [tumbleweed] If i’m being totally honest, nothing is popping off round here! There’s a lot of talent round ere not just in music but obviously you’ve got S-X as well who has just soared in the space of a couple of years. Wolves gets puts in a box with Birmingham and people don’t realise that Wolves and Birmingham are both totally different places. I wouldn’t say it’s popping off as it’s a quiet city.

Does it help you get inspiration if there’s any distractions whilst making tunes?

I suppose so but I’m more inspired when I go out of town. I’m more inspired by things that are happening, some action and the only thing which happens here is the odd big rave once in a while.

Do you have a connection to any of the Stay Fresh guys?

I’ve grown up with a lot of them and we use to be in a group called TYG when we were like fifteen. It was a little Grime group and I’m quite close with most of them. I used to be best friends with Menace aka Stay Fresh Don Menna Do you know who that is?

No, I don’t but they may have been around when I went to a Woo Riddim launch about three years ago.

They are all branching out into their own little thing now and they are all getting credit for it which is great to see people from the ends blowing up as well. I’ve been friends with them before Stay Fresh up until the point where some of us used to be in the same group and we used to play grime sets. We’d be upstairs and my mum was shouting off downstairs!

Check back to the site for the third and final part of the TRC interview next week.


Fresh Produce // TRC Interview (Part 1)

Belated Happy New Year to anyone who stumbles upon this and wonders a) Why are there no regular posts? and b) Why does it ages to load this homepage a la This Is Football on the original Playstation? I would divulge and bore you but it’s plain and simple…Good things come to those who wait (A pint of the black stuff isn’t forthcoming maybe in two months time) That being said I’m starting a new in-depth insight into producers or creatives who have caught my attention called Fresh Produce.

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Credit: Sonic Router

First up is West Midlands producer Jason Lee aka TRC who is arguably well-known for providing the Skipping Rope instrumental to Trim’s breezy I Am (off the Monkey Features Vol.2 mixtape) and Oo Aa Ee for P Money and Blacks garage hark Boo You. The versatile 23 year old has been producing grime and hip-hop beats since the age of 16 but of late has been on remix duty for Josh Osho and Aiden Grimshaw as well as releasing his popular Leak EP series of instrumentals and unreleased dubs.

In the first of a three part series, I caught up with the man himself just before Christmas to chat about his early dip into the proverbial music mire, the Bassline scene and quality control in the age of the Internet.

How you doing man?

I’m cool man. Just been chilling and that. Working on a couple tunes. What you sayin?

Not bad at all. When I was doing some research and googled your name. The first thing which came up was a random rock band.

Yeah there is a rock band called TRC but it stands for The Revolution Continues. They’ve been around since I started producing (probably even before to be honest) and they’ve been blowing up for a few years now.

Have you had any issues of name rights or anything?

Nah. I even spoke to one of them and he was cool. They used to be known under that name but they just abbreviated that and ran with it in the end.

So you started producing at the age of 16, what sort of tunes were you making in the beginning?

Just straight grime and hip-hop beats all around the 140 tempo. I was just doing that but I was never any good at it at the time [laughs]

How long did it take for you to be in a position where you were comfortable to send people your stuff?

Sometimes you just send some of the tunes out for constructive criticism. When I was that age, I probably didn’t realise how rubbish some of the tunes were and I was just sending them out to local people anyway. I never sent anything to anyone big or anything but obviously when people come back with their criticism, you start to progress. I don’t really think there should be a time when people should wait and decide whether they should send out their tunes if they are just starting, as you need to get that criticism to improve.

Is it harder now in this age with people putting up tunes so readily on Soundcloud as they just want people to hear the music? Do you think quality control is imperative?

I dunno to be honest. I think it depends on how confident you are in yourself. There’s a thin line between cocky and confident and there’s much more easy access to upload songs, so anyone can just listen for themselves. You also know how people are like on the Internet now…they’ll just say anything and don’t care. It’s a bit of a reality check for some people but I think it also tarnishes the exclusiveness of your music [if you’re] banging everything up on Soundcloud or YouTube. For example, you know when you hear a track for the first time and MistaJam plays it, “you’re like I’ve never heard this before, who’s made this?” and then there’s a big demand for the song.

How do you react to that pressure when there’s an immediate demand after such airplay?

I don’t really get swayed by things like that if I’ve already got a plan for the song which is already being promoted by a number of DJ’s.

I mentioned before how you started off making Grime and then you switched over to making a lot of Bassline where you were quite successful. What sort of impact did making that genre have in terms of honing your production style and gauging reaction to your riddims in raves?

It was good, as doing Bassline helped me find my sound and what people recognised my songs for. It was a good learning curve not just in terms of making music but meeting and working with different people in the industry. In 2007 and 2008, Bassline was massive, so being involved with that was great.

What was the reaction to Bassline from people across the globe?

When I put out the EP’s and checked the sales, I was shocked to see people from the US, Australia, Japan and China. It was just a shock to me as you don’t think your songs reach out that far.

The Breakup V.I.P. How would you rate that as a personal landmark?

That was my first Bassline tune that really put me on the map and made people turn their heads toward me and say who’s this guy? That was actually the second Bassline tune I ever made, so it was really fresh and then I followed on straight after with Lately.

What impact did DJ Apostle have on you?

He had a massive impact and being my best friend before Bassline too, as we worked together on a lot of things. He was the one who told me about it in the first place, gave me different vinyls asking my opinion and to be honest if he had never told me about it, I’d probably never had made it. He also recorded a lot of the vocals as well, so all these songs that people are hearing were courtesy of him in the studio and not me. He would send me an acapella and say see what you can do with this. If it took off…..it took off.

Have you got a nickname for him in your close circles?

Not really. [laughs] Just bossy! As whatever he says, most people have to deal with but he means well.

Would you say he’s a father figure in the scene?

Yeah he knocks sense into people and makes you realise what position you’re in. He also reminds you to pick up the pace and when Bassline was at it’s most intense, he was keeping the circle together and ensuring things were active. He was also expanding it for other people too and reaching out to people like Caliber and Burgaboy who were blowing up in the UK for Bassline. He’s really important to the scene.

Part 2 of the new Fresh Produce series will be available next week. Danke for getting down this far.


NEW VIDEO:BOILER ROOM X DANNY BROWN X DARQ E FREAKER X LUNICE

Man went to the Boiler Room. Man skanked out. Man left Boiler Room.

MTL master Lunice dunnin’ da dance as per. Peep this review of TNGHT’s recent LDN gig ere

Large up to Daaaaaany,Darq E,Lunice and the Boiler. Tough night.


NEW TING // BEATFIGHTER

Conceived by the rising and versatile Mr Mitch, Beatfighter is much a Ronseal ting. Launched yesterday, the concept is simple. Two producers go head to head each month to separate the wheat from the chaff,the yolk from the egg, John Terry from being a xenophobic knobhead (that last one is nigh impossible like trying to make me gobble liver pate for a week)

The first producers to throw their unreleased gauntlets are Sllllllleeeeeew Dem’s Spooky of Spartan fame and Darq E Freaker who crafted one of Grime’s most screwface inducing instrumentals since Forward Riddim in the form of Tempa T’s Next Hype.

Spooky – Energy Boost

Darq E Freaker – Turbo Kids

Vote on the Beatfighter site to decide whose bringing the best beats.

If you’re a producer and would like to get involved in some battles in the coming months, email info@beatfighter.co.uk.


FRESH MUSIC // BUTTERZ SUMMER ZIP [FREE DOWNLOAD]

The monthly Summer Zip from the Butterz camp dropped a few days back and as per usual the mandem Elijah and Skilliam bring a slew of sick grime instrumentals from Mr Mitch and TRC to name a few. A heavy remix from Punchdrunk’s Superisk and fellow Bristolian OH91 on one of the year’s big riddims Oo Aa Ee and even Sinden’s refix of Waka Flocka Flame avec Darq E Freaker’s Cherryade.

The forthcoming Butterz x Hardrive night at Cable promises to an ill affair with the Butterz triumvirate, the Yoda-like Kode 9,cackle captain Terror Danjah, DJ Scratcha *in Tinchy Stryder voice*, the bubblin’ Royal-T and crown prince Champion. Not the forgetting ‘grime originator’ P-Money.

Room 2 is a more tribal, funky 125-130 bpm affair with DJ Pioneer, DJ Naughty, Funkystepz, Hard House Banton, MA1, Funk Butcher and LR Groove stepping up to the plate.

Click the link to cop an earlybird ting before they get taken like grapes from outside the Turkish shop and peep the flyer above for more information.

Download the Summer Zip ere and all. Follow on @Butterzlabel


Plastician // Sounds That Speaks Volumes 11 [Free Download]

The man like Plastician drops another long-awaited mix in his now seminal Sounds That Speaks Volumes series. Sick selection and on point mixing is the order of the day. If your not a fan of wobble in your bass…you’ll learn to appreciate it as I did when he dropped and wheeled Flux’s I Can’t Stop about 6 times in Mungos Arena last year.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

 

 

Alternatively click on the link and send your email address in exchange for a free download.