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Fresh Produce // TRC Interview (Part 2)

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As part of the new Fresh Produce series, the second instalment of the TRC interview sees the West Midlands beat-smith talk about MC’s using his Grime instrumentals, the Leak EP series and his connection to the Stay Fresh collective.

So what made you switch back to making Grime? Did you feel more confident after your Bassline exploits?

To be honest, I never stopped making Grime but at the time I was doing it, there were no open doors to get involved and nobody would support my songs as I was unknown. At that point, Bassline was buzzing and I had a lot of attention from DJ’s on BBC 1Xtra and a lot of airplay, so I thought maybe my Grime might take off a bit. So I started to push out some of my Grime tunes and even though the Oo Aa Ee tune only came out in 2010, I made that in 2007. So that tune was four years old before it started blowing up and everyone was like “Where’s this tune come from?!” and I made it just as I started doing Bassline. A lot of people don’t realise most of my grime tunes are three or four years old.

What was different at the time which made you more comfortable to release those riddims?

I think it was my position which was different. I knew that if people liked it they would support it, so it was another doorway to do something I always wanted.

The same instrumental was used for Boo You too. What was it like having different MC’s from across the country jumping on that and also the Butterz crew helping out?

It’s good to see that artists value your music and they rate it. It’s nice to know that and inspires you to keep you going as well. It reaches out to more people and when they hear a big artist has used your instrumental, they wanna know who made it and then next thing you know someone else is knocking at your door and the work just keeps expanding. Having the releases on Butterz as well has helped raise my profile in Grime.

After that you had Trim jump on ‘Skipping Rope’, what was it like to work with such a revered figure from the early epochs of Grime?

It was massive as these are people I’ve listened to since I was like 13. It was a big thing for me and an honour to work with these kind of people. I’d never dreamed of working with him…I’d love to work with Trim again.

You’ve been releasing your Leak E.P series of late. How long have you been working on all those tunes for?

Some of them for a long time and others a couple of days. Most of the tunes I pitched out and they weren’t getting anywhere to be honest.  I think the first Leak EP was a bit of a dark period in my career, as I was getting frustrated that things weren’t getting out there quite as much as I wanted to and I didn’t even promote it. I just pasted a Sendspace link on my Twitter and it happened to do really well. It got about 2,000 downloads in a couple of days and it was a shock.

Do you think it’s better for the listener to make a natural choice rather than force feed it?

Definitely. If there’s a demand for it then that’s good but some people go over the top with spamming. If you’ve got a little fan base where people are interested in your music and they are not aware that things are coming out. Sometimes I’ve had people pop up and say “Have you not had any new releases?” and I’ve just put some out!

This year you’ve had the two sequels to the first Leak E.P released. On the 2nd one, there seems to be a bigger Southern Hip-Hop influence. Where did that come from?

With the second EP, I was trying to show people that I was versatile and can do almost any genre. At the time Leak E.P 2 came out, I got a lot of interest from A&R’s at the major labels and I thought it was a good time to show them I could do anything. I think that’s where the influence came from and a lot of people did contact me about beats and I got a lot of remix work off the back of it. So it did help a lot.

You recently released the third E.P. What does that release signify now in terms of your position as a producer?

That’s a hard one to answer as I’m in a bit of a funny position at the moment [laughs] I think it’s more of what I’m trying to aim it towards and it was quite hip-hop prominent [Leak EP 2]. So I’m trying to aim for that direction but at the same time a lot of the feedback I was getting said that the beats were good but we didn’t expect you to move away from your old style so much. It was a bit too much for people to take in the last Leak and I almost forgot what people kind of know me for. A lot of the beats did get used like P Money for his freestyle and that got 50,000 hits in a few days. A couple of other people have put vocals on the beats for their EP’s and it has opened a lot of doors in unusual departments.

I scrolled through your Soundcloud page and saw that a few remix clips for Aiden Grimshaw and Josh Osho. Are those out now or have they been put on the backburner by the major labels?

Well when the Aiden Grimshaw one first got played, I got loads of requests asking when that’s coming out and they accepted it which got released eventually. I know the Josh Osho one came out as well. I think the Aiden Grimshaw one was initially intended just for promo use but it got battered on radio!

Aiden Grimshaw – Is This Love (TRC Mix)

You’re from Wolverhampton?

Yeah.

Bar the football team, what’s poppin’ off in your hometown that people might not know about?

Urm…well [tumbleweed] If i’m being totally honest, nothing is popping off round here! There’s a lot of talent round ere not just in music but obviously you’ve got S-X as well who has just soared in the space of a couple of years. Wolves gets puts in a box with Birmingham and people don’t realise that Wolves and Birmingham are both totally different places. I wouldn’t say it’s popping off as it’s a quiet city.

Does it help you get inspiration if there’s any distractions whilst making tunes?

I suppose so but I’m more inspired when I go out of town. I’m more inspired by things that are happening, some action and the only thing which happens here is the odd big rave once in a while.

Do you have a connection to any of the Stay Fresh guys?

I’ve grown up with a lot of them and we use to be in a group called TYG when we were like fifteen. It was a little Grime group and I’m quite close with most of them. I used to be best friends with Menace aka Stay Fresh Don Menna Do you know who that is?

No, I don’t but they may have been around when I went to a Woo Riddim launch about three years ago.

They are all branching out into their own little thing now and they are all getting credit for it which is great to see people from the ends blowing up as well. I’ve been friends with them before Stay Fresh up until the point where some of us used to be in the same group and we used to play grime sets. We’d be upstairs and my mum was shouting off downstairs!

Check back to the site for the third and final part of the TRC interview next week.

HOMEGROWN COMEDY // KURUPT FM 1XTRA TAKEOVER

These man are on the ascent with ample audio arsenal in tow. She’s Lovin’ It…oh Gosh.

FRESH TING FRIDAY

mr_fresh

 

 

Jonwayne – Back Home

 

CAS – All Hallows (Skywlkr on the one’s and two’s)

 

Katy B – Aaliyah Please (Clicks & Whistles Re-Rub)

 

Skywlkr – Childish Gambino Feat. Danny Brown – Toxic (Instrumental)

 

Vol.36 of weekly L.A based beat cypher Team Supreme. This particular edition sees Shai’s classic 90’s slowjam ‘If I Ever Fall In Love‘ regurgitated into many a special form.

 

Kelis – Mars (from the criminally underrated Kaleidoscope LP)

 

Outkast – Knowing

 

Benji B and his string ensemble…Levels…need I say more. THE FRESH TING.

 

 

Enjoy!

 

Fresh Produce // TRC Interview (Part 1)

Belated Happy New Year to anyone who stumbles upon this and wonders a) Why are there no regular posts? and b) Why does it ages to load this homepage a la This Is Football on the original Playstation? I would divulge and bore you but it’s plain and simple…Good things come to those who wait (A pint of the black stuff isn’t forthcoming maybe in two months time) That being said I’m starting a new in-depth insight into producers or creatives who have caught my attention called Fresh Produce.

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Credit: Sonic Router

First up is West Midlands producer Jason Lee aka TRC who is arguably well-known for providing the Skipping Rope instrumental to Trim’s breezy I Am (off the Monkey Features Vol.2 mixtape) and Oo Aa Ee for P Money and Blacks garage hark Boo You. The versatile 23 year old has been producing grime and hip-hop beats since the age of 16 but of late has been on remix duty for Josh Osho and Aiden Grimshaw as well as releasing his popular Leak EP series of instrumentals and unreleased dubs.

In the first of a three part series, I caught up with the man himself just before Christmas to chat about his early dip into the proverbial music mire, the Bassline scene and quality control in the age of the Internet.

How you doing man?

I’m cool man. Just been chilling and that. Working on a couple tunes. What you sayin?

Not bad at all. When I was doing some research and googled your name. The first thing which came up was a random rock band.

Yeah there is a rock band called TRC but it stands for The Revolution Continues. They’ve been around since I started producing (probably even before to be honest) and they’ve been blowing up for a few years now.

Have you had any issues of name rights or anything?

Nah. I even spoke to one of them and he was cool. They used to be known under that name but they just abbreviated that and ran with it in the end.

So you started producing at the age of 16, what sort of tunes were you making in the beginning?

Just straight grime and hip-hop beats all around the 140 tempo. I was just doing that but I was never any good at it at the time [laughs]

How long did it take for you to be in a position where you were comfortable to send people your stuff?

Sometimes you just send some of the tunes out for constructive criticism. When I was that age, I probably didn’t realise how rubbish some of the tunes were and I was just sending them out to local people anyway. I never sent anything to anyone big or anything but obviously when people come back with their criticism, you start to progress. I don’t really think there should be a time when people should wait and decide whether they should send out their tunes if they are just starting, as you need to get that criticism to improve.

Is it harder now in this age with people putting up tunes so readily on Soundcloud as they just want people to hear the music? Do you think quality control is imperative?

I dunno to be honest. I think it depends on how confident you are in yourself. There’s a thin line between cocky and confident and there’s much more easy access to upload songs, so anyone can just listen for themselves. You also know how people are like on the Internet now…they’ll just say anything and don’t care. It’s a bit of a reality check for some people but I think it also tarnishes the exclusiveness of your music [if you’re] banging everything up on Soundcloud or YouTube. For example, you know when you hear a track for the first time and MistaJam plays it, “you’re like I’ve never heard this before, who’s made this?” and then there’s a big demand for the song.

How do you react to that pressure when there’s an immediate demand after such airplay?

I don’t really get swayed by things like that if I’ve already got a plan for the song which is already being promoted by a number of DJ’s.

I mentioned before how you started off making Grime and then you switched over to making a lot of Bassline where you were quite successful. What sort of impact did making that genre have in terms of honing your production style and gauging reaction to your riddims in raves?

It was good, as doing Bassline helped me find my sound and what people recognised my songs for. It was a good learning curve not just in terms of making music but meeting and working with different people in the industry. In 2007 and 2008, Bassline was massive, so being involved with that was great.

What was the reaction to Bassline from people across the globe?

When I put out the EP’s and checked the sales, I was shocked to see people from the US, Australia, Japan and China. It was just a shock to me as you don’t think your songs reach out that far.

The Breakup V.I.P. How would you rate that as a personal landmark?

That was my first Bassline tune that really put me on the map and made people turn their heads toward me and say who’s this guy? That was actually the second Bassline tune I ever made, so it was really fresh and then I followed on straight after with Lately.

What impact did DJ Apostle have on you?

He had a massive impact and being my best friend before Bassline too, as we worked together on a lot of things. He was the one who told me about it in the first place, gave me different vinyls asking my opinion and to be honest if he had never told me about it, I’d probably never had made it. He also recorded a lot of the vocals as well, so all these songs that people are hearing were courtesy of him in the studio and not me. He would send me an acapella and say see what you can do with this. If it took off…..it took off.

Have you got a nickname for him in your close circles?

Not really. [laughs] Just bossy! As whatever he says, most people have to deal with but he means well.

Would you say he’s a father figure in the scene?

Yeah he knocks sense into people and makes you realise what position you’re in. He also reminds you to pick up the pace and when Bassline was at it’s most intense, he was keeping the circle together and ensuring things were active. He was also expanding it for other people too and reaching out to people like Caliber and Burgaboy who were blowing up in the UK for Bassline. He’s really important to the scene.

Part 2 of the new Fresh Produce series will be available next week. Danke for getting down this far.

NEW MUSIC // BOOTY BASED MOB (VOL.ONE)

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Montreal’s Booty Bakery was based on a harmonic bed of beatsmiths who wanted to showcase a simmering sonic that has sound-tracked their bass-laden club nights in the City of Saints.

Alas the BBM crew (Note well. The only Blackberries these cats roll with are those of the handheld Vitamin C variety) which consists of the talented triumvirate of Phil Sparkz, Compton Chic and Victor Bongiovanni has released their long awaited and anticipated Booty Based Mob Vol.1

The trio have sifted the flour,beat a few eggs and whisked some buttermilk into a smooth consistency that will make you want to hit the bakery and sample some of their daily bread.

Percy’s include Hesk’s Baltimore club inspired riddim Couldn’t Be Alone which samples Ray J’s One Wish and latterly used by Burial on Archangel. (Slight Sidenote – It’s been five years since Untrue dropped….BUM-BA) The low-slung glitch bounce of Bongiovanni’s Zmell Gud , the Alaiz affiliated Da-P’s reserved but rising refix of Kid Cudi’s Memories. Tommy Kruise’s Art Of Noise inspired Hypnotize and the long-awaited dancefloor danger Drama Trap from High-Klassified.

Download via here or listen below

NEW MUSIC // HIGH-KLASSIFIED – FLEXURY

Stop the press. The young Montreal native High Klassified has just dropped Flexury his debut solo beattape on the bubblin Alaiz label and as per usual his dexterity for dense drums meshed with mellow brass soundtracks galactic reverie. The theme slyly recalls Starkey’s Universe EP for me and this Corot 9b riddim too.

In other words, this beatsmith is a predicament in the sickest/baddest/illest colloquial sense. If you know about his previous credits, then you’re fully aware that High Klassified is another star on the rise from the Piu Piu movement.

Listen above and grab the download here.

If you wanna listen to his full audio arsenal,follow him on @HighKlassified

DEEP INSIDE // Me and The BNP

Photo Credit: schnews.org.uk 

Last Saturday afternoon (September 1st)  as I made the venerable journey from the sanitised transport hub of Turnpike Lane Bus Station to the polarised periphery of North London that is Enfield. I was sat on the upper deck trying to psyche my loaf up preoccupied with my pre-match playlist which included a diluted cacophony of sounds that failed to get me into a focused frame of mind for the game which was only two hours away.

Eardrums suitably uninspired, I logged onto the capricious vidiprinter for part-time philosophers and banal banter that is Twitter. A re-tweet about a protest at King’s Cross station and workers threatening to walk out momentarily caught my attention. Yet, when I saw further descriptions of a similar demo at Blackhorse Road station near my childhood home in Walthamstow, it soon transpired that this story resonated with me in the form of enlarged pupils and raised eyebrows. The English Defence League had come to town to breach the peace and unload their uninvited codswallop outside the station.

In the meantime, I reached my destination and walked into the corner of the changing room (early for once) waiting for my teammates to arrive. As dressing rooms go you’d have thought we were primed to step out into Damascus rather than Donkey Lane, given the silence which coated the atmosphere like lumpy school dinner custard over apple crumble. A large, yet raspy fella (think Frank Butcher minus the dodgy aviators and Lizzy Duke sovereign) came into the space – full of shits and giggles – but fired up too. As he finished putting on the last of his kit, he then revealed that our opposition were a decent outfit who wore pink. In my head, I thought the fashion police would love em….but he said the team were sponsored by the BNP.

There was nervousness in the air overtly on show by the pink faces and cautious canned chuckles to pass off the news which we had just heard. Despite my deceptive serious expression, I joked with my teammates how I should be the Road Runner to the mass of Wile E. Coyotes who’ll be gunning (yes pun) for me on the pitch that tried to ease what we were about to tackle.

For me, the game ended prematurely shortly after I scored due to injury. Yet, during and after the match the opposition were concerned by what happened to me. Not a charm offensive in the slightest but maybe we had pre-judged a bunch of young people who came from a suburban town that had high anti-social crime rates and simply wanted to keep them out of trouble through the medium of sport.

Unfortunately those players will no doubt vote for the BNP in years to come mindful of the cash injection they received which has allowed them to come together in training mid-week and play on a Saturday to build a team rather than a crew of AWOL individuals. The London 2012 Olympics and Paralympics maybe finally over but I’ve got no doubt that on ‘Super Saturday’ when Mo Farah was running down the home straight in the Olympic Stadium the majority of those xenophobes I mentioned at the beginning were roaring him on to Gold in their living rooms.

Hopefully in years to come those clips will inspire young and old people in any creative capacity to realise their dreams and extinguish a minority who blame their hangover on alcohol from abroad.